cool gender neutral dating terms

lizlord:

1. datemate
2. kissfriend
3. lovebud
4. smoochdude
5. romfriend (like romantic get it)
6. my person
7. favorite friend
8. the datemeister
9. commitmentbuddy
10. coolperson

These all either sound like really shitty online dating sites or LiveJournal blogs.

thevanderghoultwist:

I love TV technology from the 1950s.  The 2” tape machines were so loud you had to wear earplugs just to be in the same room.

reeeeeel-toooo-reeeeeeeeeeeel

screwedupclickvevo:

arachnofiend:

chibisilverwings:

ambrromance:

joultonofblood:

Sums up their personalities pretty well.

Eddy: I can achieve anything
Edd: there’s a logical way to achieve what I want
Ed: there’s nothing standing in my way

Eddy hopping over the fence indicates his willingness to “cheat” the system, or to take a shortcut. Much like his schemes, it might end up being more work, but in his mind, cheating is the best way to get ahead.

Edd goes the neat and logical way, he’s straight forward. BUT, note that he closes the gate behind him rather than leaving it open. He’s incredibly meticulous and even if it’s more convenient to leave it open for anyone coming in behind him, he has to leave things neat, tidy and as he found them.

Ed is also is straight forward, he in fact is using the MOST direct route. But this route is one no one else would consider because it seems completely nonsensical. Which sums him up pretty well. The fact that it works for him is also fun to note. In general his earnestness and determination carries him through situations that most people would be stopped by.

I honestly never thought I’d see a critical analysis of Ed, Edd, and Eddy

*Jock cupping mouth in crowded high school cafeteria voice*

NEEEEEEEEEEERRRRRRRRRDDDDDDDDDSSSSSSSSSSSS

obscuruslupa:

tranxio:

"Oh my god, I’m turning into—a vampire!”

"But how? I didn’t even bite you yet!"

Premature edraculation

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

kaylapocalypse:

i don’t believe you

kaylapocalypse:

i don’t believe you

Basically, I feel like what makes Community interesting--beyond it's fairly direct and unsubtle commentaries on the Who fandom--is how, like Who, it can adapt to pretty much any genre or narrative, but unlike Who that adaptability is so tied to a singular perspective that it all but died when the showrunner changed. Your move, theonlyspiral. Your move. (I mean if you beat me I'll probably just offer a guest post on "Rick & Morty" instead.)

thartwell:

wackd:

Oh, no, I agree the show’s played the “stop telling this story, tell a better one” card more than a few times, and that may well be what the show’s doing here. The only thing that’s at issue for me is the idea that finale tropes are somehow new ground for the show.

You know, I completely forgot about “Introduction to Finality” in all this- odd because it’s one of my favorite episodes (and you’ve mentioned it repeatedly- my lack of memory for Community episode names strikes again!), but yeah, if any episode plays with finale tropes it’s that one.

Which, really, though, when you look at it, the seasons that outright play with those sorts of finale tropes (and you’re right- I had forgotten how much 4 played with this as well) are the ones where the future of the show is in the air. Season 3 ended up being Harmon’s last, and it’s difficult not to read that season finale as him effectively wrapping up the show in his departure. I don’t think anyone guessed Season 5 was a lock when the 4 finale was finished, and even now, though a sixth season and apparently a movie are up in the air, they’re not “locks” in the same way the second and third seasons were.

True.

philsandifer:

THE BATTLE CONTINUES.

So what’s different about this finale (or at least, where it appears to be headed), is that it seems to earnestly be saying, whether they get renewed or not, this is a story that’ll keep being told. That they’re not just going to contently wrap up the show in an episode and be done with it, that they’ll keep telling the story of these characters by any means possible. Which is, I think, substantially different from where the previous finales were willing to go.

I think we might have to see what happens tomorrow night before we judge that, but I’m willing to entertain the notion.

moses: let my people go
pharaoh: man what is WITH these sjws
Basically, I feel like what makes Community interesting--beyond it's fairly direct and unsubtle commentaries on the Who fandom--is how, like Who, it can adapt to pretty much any genre or narrative, but unlike Who that adaptability is so tied to a singular perspective that it all but died when the showrunner changed. Your move, theonlyspiral. Your move. (I mean if you beat me I'll probably just offer a guest post on "Rick & Morty" instead.)

giantpredatorymollusk:

philsandifer:

THE BATTLE CONTINUES.

I would like to add that while Community is doing Doctor Who stuff, its in-universe version of Doctor Who becomes limited to typical sci-fi - explosions in space, and Blorgons as far as the eye can see. This is probably because if Community did a proper parody of Doctor Who, its multi-genre episodes might seem silly as well.

Inspector Spacetime isn’t so much a method of engaging with Who as it is a method of engaging with Who fandom. That fans of both Who and Community have built a structure around this which only reenforces those not-exactly-flattering views amuses me greatly.

Inspector Spacetime is presented as a bog-standard sci-fi show not to contrast with Community itself but because it’s specifically reflective of the sort of fans that see base-under-seige as the show’s pinnacle and complain if we don’t get a Dalek episode every so often. If it was as interesting as Who, Abed would interact with it as such, and the show’d lose the ability to send up that breed of fan.

There’s a line in Season 4 where Abed espouses the view that the one female Inspector is the worst one, but not because she’s a woman—Inspector Spacetime only has a female Inspector for the purpose of demonstrating a fan shooting down the idea. It’s fairly brilliant in a way most of Season 4 and that episode in particular completely fails to be.

Basically, I feel like what makes Community interesting--beyond it's fairly direct and unsubtle commentaries on the Who fandom--is how, like Who, it can adapt to pretty much any genre or narrative, but unlike Who that adaptability is so tied to a singular perspective that it all but died when the showrunner changed. Your move, theonlyspiral. Your move. (I mean if you beat me I'll probably just offer a guest post on "Rick & Morty" instead.)

thartwell:

Fair, but it feels like this episode is pushing more for the feel of a series finale, rather than just a season finale. Like, getting all the loose ends definitively tied-off and wrapping up the show entirely- especially with the seeming declaration that there just aren’t any more stories to be told. The Wedding has similarities to Jeff’s declaration of love, but that was posited as a cliffhanger where this is being staged as a moment of resolution instead- Jeff and Britta deciding to find some sense of meaning from the past 5 years.

I’d be hard-pressed to argue that that’s not the same thing “Introduction to Finality” and “Advanced Introduction to Finality” were going for, especially given that—I mean, c’mon, look at the titles. The original “Intro” ends with the seeming declaration that all these people are in more emotionally healthy and stable places—Jeff is getting okay with the idea of confronting his past, Abed’s dialed it down a notch, Pierce will continue to get better at this whole “political correctness” thing, and Shirley, Troy, and Britta all have fairly clear career paths ahead of them. It’s very much supposed to help us connect the dots about where these people will be once they’re not on our screens anymore. “Advanced” is, perhaps, a little less nuanced about this, but Jeff and Pierce graduating is definitely supposed to be an ending. The “no more stories” thing is merely an extension of that.

Heck, the fact that most of the things displayed here are less goofy than previous finales strengthens that point- within the world of the show these things are actually much more plausible endings than the Chang Dynasty or Fistfulls of Paintballs. Of course, we know that they won’t actually end the show in this fashion (hence the buried treasure cliffhanger), but it really feels like they’re building to the idea of “What if this show really did end?”

Well, “First Chang Dynasty” isn’t an ending, it’s playing with finale tropes in a way “Intro” doesn’t have time for. (Or, perhaps, reverting to the season one structure of paperwork finale/action finale/emotional finale. Take your pick.) Regardless, plausibility isn’t at issue here—if it’s an issue of degree, it’s merely to mask the fact that the show’s been in this sandbox before. We know those endings are plausible, we saw them happen.

philsandifer:

THE BATTLE CONTINUES.

Which, to connect it back to Doctor Who, is fitting a few months after the show effectively answered the question of “What if the Doctor really did die?” Answer: He cheats and finds a new way out.

Oh, no, I agree the show’s played the “stop telling this story, tell a better one” card more than a few times, and that may well be what the show’s doing here. The only thing that’s at issue for me is the idea that finale tropes are somehow new ground for the show.

People run from rain but
sit
in bathtubs full of
water.

Charles Bukowski (via bittersweetsongs)

Wow bukowski so profound do you also bathe fully clothed you dickhead. “Oohh isn’t it funny that a person will eat when they’re hungry but will duck if you throw an apple at their face”

(via coolestpriest)

Any post making fun of Bukowski is a good post.

(via macabrekawaii)